“Unlocking the Eternal Wisdom: Exploring Profound Bhagwat Gita Shlokas, & for a Transformed Life”

“Unlocking the Eternal Wisdom: Exploring Profound Bhagavad Gita Shlokas for a Transformed Life”

1.Bhagavad Gita Shlokas

Bhagwat Gita ShlokasBhagwat Gita ShlokasBhagwat Gita ShlokasBhagwat Gita Shlokas radha

1. “You have the right to work, but never to the fruit of work.” – Bhagwat Gita Shlokas, Chapter 2, Verse 47

2. “There is neither this world nor the world beyond. Neither happiness for the one who holds on, nor for the one who lets go. There is neither liberation for the one who lives for pleasure, nor for the one who does not.” – Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 6, Verse 16

3. “Perform your obligatory duty, because action is indeed better than inaction.” – Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 3, Verse 8

4. “One who sees inaction in action, and action in inaction, is intelligent among men.” – Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 4, Verse 18

5. “A person can rise through the efforts of his mind; or draw himself down, in the same manner. Because each person is his friend or enemy.” – Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 6, Verse 5

Bhagwat Gita ShlokasBhagwat Gita ShlokasBhagwat Gita Shlokas Shree Krishna va Radha

6. “The mind acts like an enemy for those who do not control it.” – Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 6, Verse 6

7. “Yoga is the journey of the self, through the self, to the self.” – Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 6, Verse 20

8. “He who is temperate in his habits of eating, sleeping, working, and recreation can mitigate all material pains by practicing the yoga system.” – Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 6, Verse 16

9. “The soul can never be cut to pieces by any weapon, nor burned by fire, nor moistened by water, nor withered by the wind.” – Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 2, Verse 23

10. “A person who has given up all desires for sense gratification, who lives free from desires, who has given up all sense of proprietorship, and is devoid of false ego – he alone can attain real peace.” – Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 2, Verse 71

These quotes capture some of the profound teachings and insights from the Bhagavad Gita. Remember, the Bhagavad Gita is a timeless spiritual text with many layers of interpretation and wisdom.

Bhagavad Gita Shlokas

2.50 Bhagwat Gita Shlokas verses (shlokas) that offer profound wisdom and insights for a meaningful life:

1. “You have the right to work, but never to the fruit of work.” – Chapter 2, Verse 47
2. “Perform your duty equipoised, O Arjuna, abandoning all attachment to success or failure. Such equanimity is called yoga.” – Chapter 2, Verse 48

3. “The soul can never be cut to pieces by any weapon, nor burned by fire, nor moistened by water, nor withered by the wind.” – Chapter 2, Verse 23
4. “Whatever happened, happened for the good. Whatever is happening, is happening for the good. Whatever will happen, will also happen for the good.” – Chapter 2, Verse 14

5. “A person can rise through the efforts of his mind; or draw himself down, in the same manner. Because each person is his friend or enemy.” – Chapter 6, Verse 5

6. “One who is not disturbed by the incessant flow of desires—that enter like rivers into the ocean, which is ever being filled but is always still—can alone achieve peace.” – Chapter 2, Verse 70
7. “When meditation is mastered, the mind is unwavering like the flame of a lamp in a windless place.” – Chapter 6, Verse 19
8. “He who has no attachments can love others, for his love is pure and divine.” – Chapter 5, Verse 29

9. “A person can rise through the efforts of his mind; or draw himself down, in the same manner. Because each person is his friend or enemy.” – Chapter 6, Verse 5
10. “There is neither this world nor the world beyond. Neither happiness for the one who doubts, nor liberation for the one who does not.” – Chapter 4, Verse 40

11. “When a person responds to the joys and sorrows of others as if they were his own, he has attained the highest state of spiritual union.” – Chapter 6, Verse 32
12. “Fear not. What is not real, never was, and never will be. What is real, always was and cannot be destroyed.” – Chapter 2, Verse 16

13. “The mind acts like an enemy for those who do not control it.” – Chapter 6, Verse 6
14. “The meaning of Karma is in the intention. The intention behind the action is what matters.” – Chapter 4, Verse 20
15. “The soul is neither born and nor does it die.” – Chapter 2, Verse 20

16. “The power of God is with you at all times; through the activities of mind, senses, breathing, and emotions; and is constantly doing all the work using you as a mere instrument.” – Chapter 3, Verse 30
17. “He alone sees truly who sees the Lord the same in every creature, who sees the deathless in the hearts of all that die.” – Chapter 13, Verse 27

18. “A gift is pure when it is given from the heart to the right person at the right time and the right place, and when we expect nothing in return.” – Chapter 17, Verse 20
19. “You have the right to work, but never to the fruit of work.” – Chapter 2, Verse 47
20. “There are three gates to this self-destructive hell: lust, anger, and greed.” – Chapter 16, Verse 21

21. “The soul can never be cut to pieces by any weapon, nor burned by fire, nor moistened by water, nor withered by the wind.” – Chapter 2, Verse 23
22. “When a person is devoted to something with complete faith, I unify his faith in that. Then, when his faith is completely unified, he gains the object of his devotion.” – Chapter 7, Verse 21-22

23. “All that we are is the result of what we have thought. The mind is everything. What we think, we become.” – Chapter 6, Verse 5
24. “There is neither this world nor the world beyond. Neither happiness for the one who doubts, nor liberation for the one who does not.” – Chapter 4, Verse 40
25. “No one who does good work will ever come to a bad end, either here or in the world to come.” – Chapter 6, Verse 40

how many slokas in bhagavad gita

26. “The soul is neither born, and nor does it die.” – Chapter 2, Verse 20
27. “You have the right to work, but never to the fruit of work.” – Chapter 2, Verse 47
28. “Set thy heart upon thy work, but never on its reward.” – Chapter 2, Verse 47

29. “The wise sees knowledge and action as one; they see truly.” – Chapter 5, Verse 4
30. “When meditation is mastered, the mind is unwavering like the flame of a lamp in a windless place.” – Chapter 6, Verse 19

31. “He alone sees truly who sees the Lord the same in every creature, who sees the deathless in the hearts of all that die.” – Chapter 13, Verse 27
32. “A person can rise through the efforts of his mind; or draw himself down, in the same manner. Because each person is his friend or enemy.” – Chapter 6, Verse 5
33. “One who is not disturbed by the incessant flow of desires—that enter like rivers into the ocean, which is ever being filled but is always still—can alone achieve peace.” – Chapter 2, Verse 70

34. “When a person is devoted to something with complete faith, I unify his faith in that. Then, when his faith is completely unified, he gains the object of his devotion.” – Chapter 7, Verse 21-22
35. “He who has no attachments can love others, for his love is pure and divine.” – Chapter 5, Verse 29
36. “A gift is pure when it is given from the heart to the right person at the right time and the right place, and when we expect nothing in return.” – Chapter 17, Verse 20

37. “A person can rise through the efforts of his mind; or draw himself down, in the same manner. Because each person is his friend or enemy.” – Chapter 6, Verse 5
38. “When a person responds to the joys and sorrows of others as if they were his own, he has attained the highest state of spiritual union.” – Chapter 6, Verse 32
39. “When meditation has been mastered., the mind is unwavering like the flame of a lamp in a windless place.” – Chapter 6, Verse 19
40. “The meaning of Karma is in the intention. The intention behind the action is what matters.” – Chapter 4, Verse 20

41. “The power of God is with you at all times; through the activities of mind, senses, breathing, and emotions

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16.”Unlocking the Ancient Wisdom of Karma: 150 Profound Bhagavad Gita Quotes to Illuminate Your Path”

1. “You have the right to work, but never to the fruit of work.”
2. “One’s duty, though imperfectly performed, is better than another’s duty well performed.”
3. “Perform your prescribed duties, for action is better than inaction.”

4. “The wise see action in inaction, and inaction in action.”
5. “A person can rise through the efforts of his mind; or draw himself down, in the same manner.”

6. “You have control over your work alone, never the fruit.”
7. “Do your work with the welfare of others always in mind.”
8. “For those who have conquered the mind, it is their friend. For those who have failed to do so, the mind works like an enemy.”

9. “The mind acts like an enemy for those who do not control it.”
10. “A person who is not disturbed by the incessant flow of desires—that enter like rivers into the ocean, which is ever being filled but is always still—can alone achieve peace.”

11. “The senses are higher than the body; the mind is higher than the senses; the intellect is higher than the mind; and the soul is higher than the intellect.”
12. “Delusion arises from anger. The mind is bewildered by delusion. The reasoning is destroyed when the mind is bewildered.”
13. “Those who are motivated only by a desire for the fruits of action are miserable, for they are constantly anxious about the results of what they do.”

14. “You have the right to work, but never to the fruit.”
15. “One who restrains the senses and organs of action, but whose mind dwells on sense objects, certainly deludes himself and is called a pretender.”

16. “The soul can never be cut to pieces by any weapon, nor burned by fire, nor moistened by water, nor withered by the wind.”
17. “The nonpermanent appearance of happiness and distress, and their disappearance in due course, are like the appearance and disappearance of winter and summer seasons.”

18. “When meditation is mastered, the mind is unwavering like the flame of a lamp in a windless place.”
19. “The soul is neither born nor does it die.”
20. “To action alone hast thou a right and never at all to its fruits; let not the fruits of action be thy motive; neither let there be in thee any attachment to inaction.”

21. “The soul is unborn, eternal, ever-existing, undying, and primeval.”
22. “The mind is restless and difficult to restrain, but it is subdued by practice.”
23. “The self-controlled soul, who moves amongst sense objects, free from either attachment or repulsion, he wins eternal peace.”

24. “A person who has given up all desires for sense gratification, who lives free from desires, who has given up all sense of proprietorship and is devoid of false ego—such a person alone can attain real peace.”
25. “Perform your prescribed duties, but without attachment to the results.”

26. “One who has control over the mind is tranquil in heat and cold, in pleasure and pain, and honor and dishonor.”
27. “He who is without attachment, who does not rejoice when he obtains good, nor lament when he obtains evil, is firmly fixed in perfect knowledge.”
28. “Even a little effort toward spiritual awareness will protect you from the greatest fear.”
29. “One who sees inaction in action and action in inaction is intelligent among men, and he is in the transcendental position, although engaged in all sorts of activities.”
30. “All actions are carried out by the three modes of material nature.”

31. “The bewildered spirit soul, under the influence of the three modes of material nature, thinks himself to be the doer of activities that are in actuality carried out by nature.”
32. “He is not attached to the fruits of his work, yet he works with great enthusiasm.”
33. “One who performs his duty without attachment, surrendering the results unto the Supreme Lord, is unaffected by sinful action, as the lotus is untouched by water.”

34. “The senses are so strong and impetuous, O Arjuna, that they forcibly carry away the mind even of a man of discrimination who is endeavoring to control them.”
35. “He is the source of light in all luminous objects.”

36. “The force of desires is the outcome of passion, and passion is born of delusion.”
37. “The self-controlled soul, who moves amongst sense objects, free from either attachment or repulsion, he wins eternal peace.”
38. “The yogi who, abandoning attachment, acts with the body and with the mind and with the intellect, solely for self-purification, is said to have renounced action.”

39. “As the ignorant perform their duties with attachment to results, the learned may similarly act, but without attachment, for the sake of leading people on the right path.”
40. “One’s duty, even if imperfectly performed, is better than another’s duty well performed.”

41. “A person in the divine consciousness, although engaged in seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, eating, moving about, sleeping, and breathing, always knows within himself that he does nothing at all.”
42. “There is no possibility of one’s becoming a yogi, O Arjuna, if one eats too much, or eats too little, sleeps too much or does not sleep enough.”
43. “The embodied soul may be restricted from sense enjoyment, though the taste for sense objects remains.”

44. “When a person can give up all the desires of the mind, he is understood to be well established in mental equilibrium.”
45. “The nonpermanent appearance of happiness and distress, and their disappearance in due course, are like the appearance and disappearance of winter and summer seasons.”

46. “One can understand the Supreme Personality as He is only by devotional service. And when he is in full consciousness of the Supreme Lord by such devotion, he can enter into the kingdom of God.”
47. “The embodied soul is eternal in existence, indestructible, and infinite, only the material body is factually perishable.”
48. “The embodied soul is eternal in existence, indestructible, and infinite, only the material body is factually perishable.”

49. “The humble sages, by true knowledge, see with equal vision a learned and gentle brāhmaṇa, a cow, an elephant, a dog and a dog-eater [outcaste].”
50. “He is a perfect yogi who, by comparison to his self, sees the true equality of all beings, in both their happiness and their distress, O Arjuna!”

51. “There is neither this world nor the world beyond. When one extinguishes all desires, he becomes free.”
52. “A person who has given up all desires for sense gratification, who lives free from desires, who has given up all sense of proprietorship and is devoid of false ego—such a person alone can attain real peace.”
53. “Perform your prescribed duties but without attachment to the results.”

54. “One who sees inaction in action and action in inaction is intelligent among men, and he is in the transcendental position, although engaged in all sorts of activities.”
55. “All actions are carried out by the three modes of material nature.”

56. “The bewildered spirit soul, under the influence of the three modes of material nature, thinks himself to be the doer of activities that are in actuality carried out by nature.”
57. “He is not attached to the fruits of his work, yet he works with great enthusiasm.”
58. “One who performs his duty without attachment, surrendering the results unto the Supreme Lord, is unaffected by sinful action, as the lotus is untouched by water.”

59. “The senses are so strong and impetuous, O Arjuna, that they forcibly carry away the mind even of a man of discrimination who is endeavoring to control them.”
60. “He is the source of light in all luminous objects.”

61. “The force of desires is the outcome of passion, and passion is born of delusion.”
62. “The self-controlled soul, who moves amongst sense objects, free from either attachment or repulsion, he wins eternal peace.”
63. “The yogi who, abandoning attachment, acts with the body and with the mind and with the intellect, solely for self-purification, is said to have renounced action.”

64. “As the ignorant perform their duties with attachment to results, the learned may similarly act, but without attachment, for the sake of leading people on the right path.”
65. “One’s duty, even if imperfectly performed, is better than another’s duty well performed.”

66. “A person in the divine consciousness, although engaged in seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, eating, moving about, sleeping, and breathing, always knows within himself that he does nothing at all.”
67. “There is no possibility of one’s becoming a yogi, O Arjuna, if one eats too much, or eats too little, sleeps too much or does not sleep enough.”
68. “The embodied soul may be restricted from sense enjoyment, though the taste for sense objects remains.”

69. “When a person can give up all the desires of the mind, he is understood to be well established in mental equilibrium.”
70. “The nonpermanent appearance of happiness and distress, and their disappearance in due course, are like the appearance and disappearance of winter and summer seasons.”

71. “One can understand the Supreme Personality as He is only by devotional service. And when he is in full consciousness of the Supreme Lord by such devotion, he can enter into the kingdom of God.”
72. “The embodied soul is eternal in existence, indestructible, and infinite, only the material body is factually perishable.”
73. “The humble sages, by true knowledge, see with equal vision a learned and gentle brāhmaṇa, a cow, an elephant, a dog and a dog-eater [outcaste].”

74. “He is a perfect yogi who, by comparison to his self, sees the true equality of all beings, in both their happiness and their distress, O Arjuna!”
75. “There is neither this world nor the world beyond. When one extinguishes all desires, he becomes free.”

76. “Perform your prescribed duties but without attachment to the results.”
77. “One who sees inaction in action and action in inaction is intelligent among men, and he is in the transcendental position, although engaged in all sorts of activities.”
78. “All actions are carried out by the three modes of material nature.”

79. “The bewildered spirit soul, under the influence of the three modes of material nature, thinks himself to be the doer of activities that are in actuality carried out by nature.”
80. “He is not attached to the fruits of his work, yet he works with great enthusiasm.”

81. “One who performs his duty without attachment, surrendering the results unto the Supreme Lord, is unaffected by sinful action, as the lotus is untouched by water.”
82. “The senses are so strong and impetuous, O Arjuna, that they forcibly carry away the mind even of a man of discrimination who is endeavoring to control them.”
83. “He is the source of light in all luminous objects.”

84. “The force of desires is the outcome of passion, and passion is born of delusion.”
85. “The self-controlled soul, who moves amongst sense objects, free from either attachment or repulsion, he wins eternal peace.”

86. “The yogi who, abandoning attachment, acts with the body and with the mind and with the intellect, solely for self-purification, is said to have renounced action.”
87. “As the ignorant perform their duties with attachment to results, the learned may similarly act, but without attachment, for the sake of leading people on the right path.”
88. “One’s duty, even if imperfectly performed, is better than another’s duty well performed.”

89. “A person in the divine consciousness, although engaged in seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, eating, moving about, sleeping, and breathing, always knows within himself that he does nothing at all.”
90. “There is no possibility of one’s becoming a yogi, O Arjuna, if one eats too much, or eats too little, sleeps too much or does not sleep enough.”

91. “The embodied soul may be restricted from sense enjoyment, though the taste for sense objects remains.”
92. “When a person can give up all the desires of the mind, he is understood to be well established in mental equilibrium.”
93. “The nonpermanent appearance of happiness and distress, and their disappearance in due course, are like the appearance and disappearance of winter and summer seasons.”

94. “One can understand the Supreme Personality as He is only by devotional service. And when he is in full consciousness of the Supreme Lord by such devotion, he can enter into the kingdom of God.”
95. “The embodied soul is eternal in existence, indestructible, and infinite, only the material body is factually perishable.”

96. “The humble sages, by true knowledge, see with equal vision a learned and gentle brāhmaṇa, a cow, an elephant, a dog and a dog-eater [outcaste].”
97. “He is a perfect yogi who, by comparison to his self, sees the true equality of all beings, in both their happiness and their distress, O Arjuna!”

98. “There is neither this world nor the world beyond. When one extinguishes all desires, he becomes free.”
99. “Perform your prescribed duties but without attachment to the results.”
100. “One who sees inaction in action and action in inaction is intelligent among men, and he is in the transcendental position, although engaged in all sorts of activities.”

101. “All actions are carried out by the three modes of material nature.”
102. “The bewildered spirit soul, under the influence of the three modes of material nature, thinks himself to be the doer of activities that are in actuality carried out by nature.”
103. “He is not attached to the fruits of his work, yet he works with great enthusiasm.”

104. “One who performs his duty without attachment, surrendering the results unto the Supreme Lord, is unaffected by sinful action, as the lotus is untouched by water.”
105. “The senses are so strong and impetuous, O Arjuna, that they forcibly carry away the mind even of a man of discrimination who is endeavoring to control them.”

106. “He is the source of light in all luminous objects.”
107. “The force of desires is the outcome of passion, and passion is born of delusion.”
108. “The self-controlled soul, who moves amongst sense objects, free from either attachment or repulsion, he wins eternal peace.”

109. “The yogi who, abandoning attachment, acts with the body and with the mind and with the intellect, solely for self-purification, is said to have renounced action.”
110. “As the ignorant perform their duties with attachment to results, the learned may similarly act, but without attachment, for the sake of leading people on the right path.”

111. “One’s duty, even if imperfectly performed, is better than another’s duty well performed.”
112. “A person in the divine consciousness, although engaged in seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, eating, moving about, sleeping, and breathing, always knows within himself that he does nothing at all.”
113. “There is no possibility of one’s becoming a yogi, O Arjuna, if one eats too much, or eats too little, sleeps too much, or does not sleep enough.”
114. “The embodied soul may be restricted from sense enjoyment, though the taste for sense objects remains.”
115. “When a person can give up all the desires of the mind, he is understood to be well established in mental equilibrium.”

116. “The nonpermanent appearance of happiness and distress, and their disappearance in due course, are like the appearance and disappearance of winter and summer seasons.

“117. “One can understand the Supreme Personality as He is only by devotional service. And when he is in full consciousness of the Supreme Lord by such devotion, he can enter into the kingdom of God.”
118. “The embodied soul is eternal in existence, indestructible, and infinite, only the material body is factually perishable.”
119. “The humble sages, by true knowledge, see with equal vision a learned and gentle brāhmaṇa, a cow, an elephant, a dog and a dog-eater [outcaste].”
120. “He is a perfect yogi who, by comparison to his self, sees the true equality of all beings, in both their happiness and their distress, O Arjuna!”

121. “There is neither this world nor the world beyond. When one extinguishes all desires, he becomes free.”
122. “Perform your prescribed duties, but without attachment to the results.”
123. “One who sees inaction in action and action in inaction is intelligent among men, and he is in the transcendental position, although engaged in all sorts of activities.”
124. “All actions are carried out by the three modes of material nature.”

125. “The bewildered spirit soul, under the influence of the three modes of material nature, thinks himself to be the doer of activities that are in actuality carried out by nature.”
126. “He is not attached to the fruits of his work, yet he works with great enthusiasm.”
127. “One who performs his duty without attachment, surrendering the results unto the Supreme Lord, is unaffected by sinful action, as the lotus is untouched by water.”

128. “The senses are so strong and impetuous, O Arjuna, that they forcibly carry away the mind even of a man of discrimination who is endeavoring to control them.”
129. “He is the source of light in all luminous objects.”
130. “The force of desires is the outcome of passion, and passion is born of delusion.”

131. “The self-controlled soul, who moves amongst sense objects, free from either attachment or repulsion, he wins eternal peace.”
132. “The yogi who, abandoning attachment, acts with the body and with the mind and with the intellect, solely for self-purification, is said to have renounced action.”
133. “As the ignorant perform their duties with attachment to results, the learned may similarly act, but without attachment, for the sake of leading people on the right path.”

134. “One’s duty, even if imperfectly performed, is better than another’s duty well performed.”
135. “A person in the divine consciousness, although engaged in seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, eating, moving about, sleeping, and breathing, always knows within himself that he does nothing at all.”

136. “There is no possibility of one’s becoming a yogi, O Arjuna, if one eats too much, or eats too little, sleeps too much, or does not sleep enough.”
137. “The embodied soul may be restricted from sense enjoyment, though the taste for sense objects remains.”
138. “When a person can give up all the desires of the mind, he is understood to be well established in mental equilibrium.”

139. “The nonpermanent appearance of happiness and distress, and their disappearance in due course, are like the appearance and disappearance of winter and summer seasons.”
140. “One can understand the Supreme Personality as He is only by devotional service. And when he is in full consciousness of the Supreme Lord by such devotion, he can enter into the kingdom of God.”

141. “The embodied soul is eternal in existence, indestructible, and infinite, only the material body is factually perishable.”
142. “The humble sages, by true knowledge, see with equal vision a learned and gentle brāhmaṇa, a cow, an elephant, a dog and a dog-eater [outcaste].”

143. “He is a perfect yogi who, by comparison to his self, sees the true equality of all beings, in both their happiness and their distress, O Arjuna!”
144. “There is neither this world nor the world beyond. When one extinguishes all desires, he becomes free.”
145. “Perform your prescribed duties, but without attachment to the results.”

146. “One who sees inaction in action and action in inaction is intelligent among men, and he is in the transcendental position, although engaged in all sorts of activities.”
147. “All actions are carried out by the three modes of material nature.”
148. “The bewildered spirit soul, under the influence of the three modes of material nature, thinks himself to be the doer of activities that are in actuality carried out by nature.”

149. “He is not attached to the fruits of his work, yet he works with great enthusiasm.”
150. “One who performs his duty without attachment, surrendering the results unto the Supreme Lord, is unaffected by sinful action, as the lotus is untouched by water.”

17.50 Bhagavad Gita quotes in English:

1. “You have the right to work, but never to the fruit of work.”
2. “Perform your prescribed duties, for action is better than inaction.”
3. “The wise see action in inaction, and inaction in action.”

4. “A person can rise through the efforts of his mind; or draw himself down, in the same manner.”
5. “You have control over your work alone, never the fruit.”
6. “Do your work with the welfare of others always in mind.”

7. “For those who have conquered the mind, it is their friend. For those who have failed to do so, the mind works like an enemy.”
8. “The mind acts like an enemy for those who do not control it.”
9. “The soul can never be cut to pieces by any weapon, nor burned by fire, nor moistened by water, nor withered by the wind.”

10. “The nonpermanent appearance of happiness and distress, and their disappearance in due course, are like the appearance and disappearance of winter and summer seasons.”
11. “When meditation is mastered, the mind is unwavering like the flame of a lamp in a windless place.”
12. “To action alone hast thou a right and never at all to its fruits; let not the fruits of action be thy motive; neither let there be in thee any attachment to inaction.”
13. “The soul is neither born and nor does it die.”

14. “The self-controlled soul, who moves amongst sense objects, free from either attachment or repulsion, he wins eternal peace.”
15. “One who restrains the senses and organs of action, but whose mind dwells on sense objects, certainly deludes himself and is called a pretender.”
16. “The embodied soul is eternal in existence, indestructible, and infinite, only the material body is factually perishable.”

17. “One who has control over the mind is tranquil in heat and cold, in pleasure and pain, and honor and dishonor.”
18. “He who is without attachment, who does not rejoice when he obtains good, nor lament when he obtains evil, is firmly fixed in perfect knowledge.”
19. “Even a little effort toward spiritual awareness will protect you from the greatest fear.”

20. “One who is not disturbed in mind even amidst the threefold miseries or elated when there is happiness, and who is free from attachment, fear, and anger, is called a sage of steady mind.”
21. “One who is equal to friends and enemies, who are equipoised in honor and dishonor, heat and cold, happiness and distress, fame and infamy, who is always free from contaminating association, always silent and satisfied with anything, who doesn’t care for any residence, who is fixed in knowledge and engaged in devotional service, is very dear to Me.”
22. “The soul can never be cut to pieces by any weapon, nor burned by fire, nor moistened by water, nor withered by the wind.”

23. “The yogi whose mind is fixed on Me verily attains the highest perfection of transcendental happiness.”
24. “For one who has conquered the mind, the mind is the best of friends; but for one who has failed to do so, his very mind will be his greatest enemy.”
25. “That which is non-existent can never come into being, and that which is can never cease to exist. By these criteria, the seers of truth have concluded the same.”

26. “The soul is never born and never dies; nor does it ever cease to exist. It is unborn, eternal, ever-existing, and primeval. It is not slain when the body is slain.”
27. “A person can rise through the efforts of his mind; or draw himself down, in the same manner. Because each person is his friend or enemy in his life.”
28. “One who sees inaction in action and action in inaction is intelligent among men, and he is in the transcendental position, although engaged in all sorts of activities.”

29. “There is neither this world nor the world beyond. When one extinguishes all desires, he becomes free.”
30. “The humble sages, under true knowledge, see with equal vision a learned and gentle brāhmaṇa, a cow, an elephant, a dog, and a dog-eater [outcaste].”
31. “He is a perfect yogi who, by comparison to his self, sees the true equality of all beings, in both their happiness and their distress, O Arjuna!”

32. “A person in the divine consciousness, although engaged in seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, eating, moving about, sleeping, and breathing, always knows within himself that he does nothing at all.”
33. “To action alone hast thou a right and never at all to its fruits; let not the fruits of action be thy motive; neither let there be in thee any attachment to inaction.”
34. “Perform your prescribed duties, for action is better than inaction.”

35. “The soul is neither born and nor does it die.”
36. “When meditation is mastered, the mind is unwavering like the flame of a lamp in a windless place.”
37. “The yogi who, abandoning attachment, acts with the body and with the mind and with the intellect, solely for self-purification, is said to have renounced action.”

38. “As the ignorant perform their duties with attachment to results, the learned may similarly act, but without attachment, for the sake of leading people on the right path.”
39. “One’s duty, though imperfectly performed, is better than another’s duty well performed.”
40. “The force of desires is the outcome of passion, and passion is born of delusion.”

41. “The self-controlled soul, who moves amongst sense objects, free from either attachment or repulsion, he wins eternal peace.”
42. “The embodied soul may be restricted from sense enjoyment, though the taste for sense objects remains.”
43. “The nonpermanent appearance of happiness and distress, and their disappearance in due course, are like the appearance and disappearance of winter and summer seasons.”

44. “One can understand the Supreme Personality as He is only by devotional service. And when he is Fully aware of the Supreme Lord by such devotion, he can enter into the kingdom of God.”
45. “The senses are higher than the body; the mind is higher than the senses; the intellect is higher than the mind; and the soul is higher than the intellect.”
46. “The humble sages, under true knowledge, see with equal vision a learned and gentle brāhmaṇa, a cow, an elephant, a dog, and a dog-eater [outcaste].”

47. “He is a perfect yogi who, by comparison to his self, sees the true equality of all beings, in both their happiness and their distress, O Arjuna!”
48. “There is neither this world nor the world beyond. When one extinguishes all desires, he becomes free.”
49. “Perform your prescribed duties but without attachment to the results.”
50. “One who sees inaction in action and action in inaction is intelligent among men,

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